Our Visionaries

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Experience Encantada

Encantada is the new restaurant located on AVAM's 3rd floor that features local Chesapeake cooking. Drawing on the importance of "roots," both creative and culinary, Encantada supports regional farms, ranches, and aqua-culture, thus nurturing the concept of sustainability. Experience this enchanted escape where boundaries are blurred and tastes are celebrated.

Visit EncantadaBaltimore.com or call 410-752-1000 for reservations or more info.

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The following is a brief listing of some of AVAM's visionary artists from our permanent collection. We are working to eventually add bios and photos for all our permanent collection artists in the future. There are many more artists and works on display at the museum, and we encourage you to visit us and explore these visionaries' creations & discover their inspiring stories.

James Harold Jennings

Jennings chose to live without electricity, running water or a telephone in order to create artwork which filled his yard. He carved each whirligig, windmill, sign and wood figure with a simple knife, assembling and printing them with house paint.

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Clyde Jones

Clyde Jones is recognized for his wooden creations better known as "critters." His home in Bynum, NC, which is decorated with paintings of sea creatures and large penguins, bears a large yellow sign outside that reads, "Critter Crossing." Formerly a mill worker, Jones has been creating his critters since 1982 and uses a chainsaw to mold stumps and log remnants. His fondness for both animals and the environment are represented through his work.

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Nancy Josephson

Nancy Josephson uses beads, mirrors, rhinestones, sequins and glue to create art from everyday objects in a style evocative of Haitian flags and banners. She is also a well-known ArtCar artist.

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Leonard Knight

In 1966, Knight quit his job and set out to wander across the country in a 1951 Chevrolet truck as a self proclaimed "hobo bird." Knight was sustained by deep religious convictions when his truck broke down in Nebraska, he stopped traveling and yielded to a vision of creating the world's largest hot air balloon, with the words "God Is Love" painted on the side.

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Norbert H. Kox

For ten years he meditated and lived by himself in the woods near Suring, Wisconsin. Here he built a personal chapel and a "Gospel Road" with scripture-based messages leading through the forest. In 1985, he returned to Green Bay to pursue an education at the University of Wisconsin, after which he took up painting full-time as his way of life.

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Esther Krinitz

Esther Nisenthal Krinitz grew up in the exquisite countryside of rural Poland. Her talents as a seamstress were evident by age eight when she sewed and embroidered a festival folk costume that earned the amazed admiration of the village professional seamstress. Esther was just twelve years old when Nazis arrived on horseback at her rural homeland and began occupying her village for the next three years.

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Renaldo Kuhler

Born in Teaneck, New Jersey in 1931, Renaldo Kuhler was the only son of a German immigrant who became famous for designing steam locomotives with a streamlined Art Deco look. When Otto Kuhler retired in 1948, he moved his family from the suburbs of New York to a remote valley in Colorado to live the life of a cowboy. Seventeen-year-old Renaldo did not, however, share his father's dream, and he found the isolation unbearable.

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William Kurelek

William Kurelek was born in 1927 to a Ukrainian farm family who had immigrated to the Canadian prairie lands. The eldest of seven children, Kurelek developed his passion for art at an early age, but was adamantly discouraged by his father to pursue his interest.

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Adam Kurtzman

Adam Kurtzman was born on January 19, 1957 in Brooklyn, and raised in Long Island and New Jersey. His father was an electrical engineer and brother of renowned MAD magazine cartoonist Harvey Kurtzman.

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Wayne Kusy

"There's a lot of people who like to climb mountains like Mount Everest...I choose to build models. It's safer." –Wayne Kusy

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Patty Kuzbida

"I like breaking once-expensive china sets I pick up for nothing secondhand. You can tell that they were thought 'too good to use' so I give them new life outside the cabinet."–Patty Kuzbida

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Geraldine O. Lloyd

"I have an abiding faith that everything is in perfect order. I wait and watch and hope I have the strength to show up for the challenges. I love life and being of service in every way I can."–Geraldine O. Lloyd

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Andrew Logan

"My life is an artistic adventure. The message of joy and happiness, to celebrate human existence." –Andrew Logan

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Stephanie Lucas

Stephanie Lucas was born on November 19, 1975 in Picardy, France. She worked as a sales shop girl for 15 years and was very unhappy. One day, she heard a clear, strong voice say, "You must paint."

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Ray Materson

Most of Materson's miniature embroideries include approximately 1,200 stitches per square inch and measure less than 2.5 x 3 inches.

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Christine McCormick

Born into a prominent Baltimore family, Christine was diagnosed both mildly mentally disabled and mentally ill, and committed to Springfield Hospital while still a young teen. In her early 20's, she spontaneously developed her own technique of pointillism–stripping her paintbrush down to 2-3 hairs.

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Adam Morales

Adam Morales has spent his entire life living within 50 feet of the place where he was born in 1947, in the village of Pierre Part in Assumption Parish, Louisiana. He's never more than a few yards from water on either side of his property, and when the Mississippi starts rising in late February each year, he can shove off in a small boat from his dock and go nearly anywhere in the great Atchafalaya Swamp.

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Eddy Mumma

Florida outsider artist Eddy Mumma (aka Mr. Eddy), a recluse and double amputee, found solace and delight in the production of explosively joyful paintings.

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Donald Pass

Donald Pass (1930–2010) was a well-known painter of lyrical abstract landscapes until the late 1960s, when he experienced a series of spiritual visions of the Resurrection that radically and forever changed his view of reality, and subsequently, his artwork.

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Yanni Posnakoff

In 1965, he moved to New York, opened an arts café and bakery, and made and widely exhibited his artwork. Obsessed with angels since childhood, he vowed to paint 100,000 angels of all shapes, sizes, and colors during his lifetime. "I used to see them as a child, even now I see them in some people," he says.

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Tressa "Grandma" Prisbrey

Tressa "Grandma" Prisbrey's long life could be described as anything but ordinary – even before she began to fashion her famous bottle village.

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Mary Proctor

Mary likes to think of herself as a missionary rather than an artist. "I'm just a messenger and they (the people who collect her work) are the deliverers."

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Martin Ramirez

When Martin Ramirez came to America in 1925 it was to get work building railroads in Northern California but he did not remain in this profession for very long. While in America he wrote letters to his wife and four children in Mexico and drew pictures in the margins until he was hospitalized in the early '30s and diagnosed with schizophrenia.

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Chris Roberts-Antieau

"Even when awful things happen to me, I've found wonderful things along the way. That's what my art is about: the joy and wonder and humor that's all around us, every day." –Chris Roberts-Antieau

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